Archive for: ‘November 2018’

Red hot tech for pig cull

20/11/2018 Posted by admin

SHOOT: Ron Kocaj on board the Riverina LLS, where infra-red thermal imaging technology was mounted to survey more than 180,000 hectares in south west NSW recently.A WHOPPING haul of feral pigs were culled in a western Riverina aerial shooting program in November last year, aided by the use of thermal imaging technology to track the damaging porkers.
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An infra-red thermal imaging technology was mounted to a helicopter for an aerial survey overmore than 180,000 hectares in south west NSW.The surveywas completed byWestern, Riverina and Murray Local Land Services late last year.

Project co-ordinatorMichael Leane, of Riverina LLS, said the new eye in the sky enabled the survey to sweep previously inaccessible country in the lignum country and sodden floodplains of the Lowbidgee, which painted a clearer picture of the pest numbers in the survey area.

“By using the helicopter and thermal imaging, we also gained access to areas that we simply couldn’t reach from the ground and we now have baseline data to track progress in our feral animal control programs over the next two years.”

Mr Leane said the accurate survey allowed shooters to hone in with deadly accuracy and deliver an impressive cull. Atwo week aerial shooting program destroyed 4416feral pigs, with shooting team in two helicopters.

The survey area was sampled from a 1.3 million hectares project area in LLS regions and funded by the federal government’s Pest and Weed Drought program

“We filmed 900 kilometres of flight path over 180,000 hectareswithin the project area and the results were incredibly accurate, compared with other monitoring techniques,” he said.

“We wow have solid baseline figures for pig numbers, which we didn’t have before and this has allowed us to target more accurately areas of higher density (in pigs).”

Mr Leane said the new baseline data would be of use to private landholders, who could use the survey to quantify the overall effectiveness of a cull on their property.

“Next time we can say to a farmer we shot a certainpercentage of the pigs on their property, rather than just a raw number,” he said.

Tupra Pastoral Company, located between Mildura and Griffith, was one of the private holdings involved in the program.

Tupra manager David Rankinprovidedaccommodation for the control program team at the shearing quarters on the property.

“Our company likes to be involved in the aerial shooting program… In a matter of hours, hundreds of pigs can be destroyed, then we use variedways to control the balance, including hunting…”

The program combinedNational Parks and Wildlife Service and NSW Primary Industries Office of Water, as well as private landholders who volunteered to take part,as part of the Nimmie-Caira water-saving project in the Murrumbidgee region.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Aussies, let us rejoice

20/11/2018 Posted by admin

THIS is a story about Bill and Gary and what they get up to on the beach most mornings.
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Bill is a dentist. I don’t know if he’s one of those smiley “How-ya-doin’-my-name’s-Bill-and-I’m-here-to-help” kind of dentists who promise pain-free teeth removal, until you’re inclined on a chair with your mouth wide open, andthere’s a whispered “Oops” in your ear and blood on the floor.

He doesn’t look like that kind of dentist, but then none of them do.

Anyway, he lives in a nice house on a leafy street with great views of the ocean.

I know this because a friend of mine lives next door and I’ve occasionally glanced/peered/spied on Bill as he’s cleaned his pool.

It’s because of the glancing/peering/spying that I recognised him on the beach one day, a while ago, when he was there with another man I’ve come to know as Gary, Bill’s mate.

The first time I saw them they were doing push-ups together. On the beach. Try it sometime. It feels as lousy as it looks.

The next time I saw them they were running together in the soft sand. It was like watching the opening credits for Baywatch–all slow motion action, hair billowing in the breeze, muscles bulging. Except Bill and Gary were wearing middleaged men-type t-shirts and baggy shorts rather than body-hugging red swimmers, and there wasn’t a Pamela Anderson to be seen.

The other difference was that the world suddenly hadn’t gone slow-mo on me, butBill and Gary made it looklike they had. But good on them, I thought. What didn’t break them, or give them a heart attack or heat stroke, would only make them stronger.

Why am I writing about Bill and Gary today, while sending them up, ever so slightly?

Because they’re good guys, and I think we need to hear about good people doing good things without even a thought of getting recognition for it because the bad guys seem to attract and hold our attention way too often.

Most mornings Bill and Gary are down on the beach doing sporty things, but they also clean it. For quite some time now they’ve picked up the rubbishleft by other people.

It’s a popular resort beach. People leave loads of rubbish.

The plastic bottles are annoying, the glass bottles are dangerous. People leave cans. They leave pizza boxes and half-eaten pizzas, kebab wrappers, clothes, thongs, piles of paper rubbish, broken chairs,umbrellas and sun shades, sunscreen, towels…the list goes on.

It’s clear they don’t mean to leave some things. It’s also clear plenty of people have left the beach without giving any thought to what could happen to the rubbish they’ve left behind.

So Bill and Gary clear it up before most of the rest of us are even out of bed.

That’s not the only good work Bill and Gary do, without fanfare, but it’s enough to make my point here.

There are manypeople like Bill and Gary who act like the oil that keeps the wheels turning in our communities. They don’t do big stuff, but they do the kinds of things that lift us from being a lot of individuals living in close proximity, to being groups which are capable of thinking beyond just our own needs.

We’re a few days away from the Australia Day gongs. The likes of Bill and Gary don’t get nominated for awards for picking up other people’s rubbish, day in and day out. They’re happy with a“Good on you, mate” from passers-by, or better, another volunteer rubbish cleaner to lend a hand.

Over the past few years of writing about child sexual abuse I’ve met other extraordinary people who have been not so much the oil in the wheels, as the squeak in the wheels –the ones who wouldn’t give up fighting for justice for the many.

In the Hunter there are many who fit that category, quite a few who don’t want to be named, but some who recognised they needed to be.

Bob and Bev O’Toole, Peter Gogarty, Rob Roseworne, Graham Rundle, Audrey Nash, David Owen, Bishop Greg Thompson, Michael Elliott, John Cleary, two men I’ll call Tom and Steve (because they know who they are), are just a few who deserve awards for their championing of some of the most vulnerable people in our communities, up against some of this country’s most powerful institutions.

Beyond the Hunter there are many more –Craig Hughes-Cashmore and Shane McNamara of SAMSN (Survivors and Mates Support Network) and Broken Rites in Melbourne being outstanding examples -but I’d like to write about just one more person now.

Leonie Sheedy was born in 1954 but has no memory of family before she was made a ward of the state and placed in a Catholic orphanage. The National Library of Australia has an interview by Leonie for the Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants oral history project, in which she talks about an orphanage childhoodand decision to set up a support group for thousands of people who shared her experiences –Care Leavers Australia Network (CLAN).

Leonie Sheedy was at the September, 2012 meeting in Newcastle that showed community backing for the Newcastle Herald’s campaign for a royal commission into institutional child sexual abuse.

She has been at royal commission public hearings supporting survivors, and has been an outspoken and outstanding advocate for some of the most neglected and abandoned people in our communities.

In 2007 she was awarded the Order of Australia medal, and in December Malcolm Turnbull appointed her a member of an independent council to help shape a $4 billion national redress scheme for survivors of institutional child sexual abuse.

We should give thanks to all of them –and many others –on January 26.

Gibson claims top honour

20/11/2018 Posted by admin

RUNNER-UP: Clyde Vearing scored 40 points to finish in second place in the stableford event.
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Ian Gibson won thestableford event at ChalambarGolf Club on Saturday.

Finished with a score of three over par ahead of Greg Kerr.

Brad Ward won the B Grade ahead of Xavier Vearing while Bill Coxall won the C Grade.

Nearest the pins went to Rob Richardson on the first hole, Sam Cronin on the second, Phil Hall on the sixth and Robert Harricks on the eighth hole.

In the back nine, Kerr picked up a nearest the pin on the 15thhole, Ken Hurnall on the 16thand Rob Porter on the 18thhole.

Ward also picked up the secret six best score while Porter won the birdie hole after his efforts on the last hole of the round.

John Berg took out the honours in theclub’s stableford event on January 12.

He scored 45 points to win comfortably with Clyde Vearing and Greg Pugh finishing in equal second on 40 points.

Berg also won the nine hole chicken run with 22 points ahead of Lloyd Grice and Ian Bruce.

In the women’s golf, Marianne Easton and Elaine Richie teamed up to win the two person par event on Wednesday.

Sue White and Sue Leeke finished in second place on a countback ahead of Marg Peoples and Chris Hurstfield.

Judy Edwards won the stableford event with a score of 22 points on Monday.

Ceal Gubbins scored 19 points to finish second after a countback was needed to separate Gubbins and Nola Mahoney.

Sharon Powell collected the nearest the pin award in long time member Margot Greene’s last round of golf at the club.

Marg Brehaut started the weekend off on a positive after she won the stableford event on Saturday.

Brehaut scored 39 points to claim the narrow victory ahead of Gayle Dadswell who was one shot further back.

Sandra Brady picked up the nearest the pin for performance on the 16thhole.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

No rain on wineries’ parade

20/11/2018 Posted by admin

DEVELOPING: Bill Ford from Boston Bay Wines with some of the grapes growing at the winery.
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Despite a wet summer, fruit at Port Lincoln vineyards have been unaffected by the rain.

Port Lincoln has hadplenty of rainfall this summer with nearly 32 millimetres falling in December, including two straight days of more than 12mmon December 26 and 27.

On top of this nearly 8mmwas recorded in Port Lincoln on January 13.

However Port Lincoln vineyards have not beenaffected by the abnormally wet weather andgrapesare clear of any rain related issues at this stage.

Lincoln Estate manager Kym Turvey said weather had been “all over the place” but the grapes were still lookinggood.

“It’s been so dry that a little bit of rain won’t be the end of the world,” he said.

“We’re keeping an eye on things and keeping our sprays up.”

Mr Turvey said any risk of disease from the rainfall was also limited because they hadsprayedtheir vineyards in September, October and November last year.

He said the region was also doing better than others in the state.

“The problem in the Adelaide Hills is it’s been so wet they can’t get in the vineyardsbut here we’re not as wet as the Adelaide Hills,” he said.

Boston Bay Wines is also on track for thisseason’s grape harvest.

Boston Bay Wines manager Tony Ford said the winery was developing a “ripper crop” with no signs of disease or mildew.

“We’ve got a little bit of grapes that are uneven in some areas but in all cases we’ve got a ripper crop,” he said.

“It’s been a very wet summer altogether but there’s no mildew forming.”

Mr Ford said a little bit of rain in the next two weeks would be welcomed but in order to finish the crop before harvest they were hoping not to have too many hot days or warm northerly winds.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Horsham recognises outstanding citizensPhotos

20/11/2018 Posted by admin

Horsham recognises outstanding citizens | Photos Kingsley Dalgleish
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Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kingsley Dalgleish

Kara Johnson

Kara Johnson

Kara Johnson

Kara Johnson

Kara Johnson

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

HAC 50th anniversary spectacular

TweetFacebookCitizen of the Year – Kingsley DalgleishMotto – Kingsley Dalgleish:“Volunteering is the greatest form of democracy – I get to vote with my time for the type of community that I wish to live in”.

Kingsley is recognised for his outstanding involvement and contributions in many sectors, including:Junior football at regional and state levels for 28 yearsMember of Wimmera Representative Team at Victorian Championships (football)Junior Football Development officer for the Wimmera regional for over 15 yearsRepresentative on the Victorian Country Football League’s junior board for several yearsHorsham co-ordinator and district manager of Auskick for 18 yearsAustralian Football Coaches Association memberCoach of a number of sporting groups (junior cricket, soccer, volleyball, softball) and football umpiringVarious administrative and executive positions for a wide range of sporting groupsCoach of Horsham Swimming Club at local, club and regional level for 7 yearsChairperson of Horsham and District Relay for Life and representative of the committee at State summitsLife member of Horsham Saints Football Netball Club and Wimmera Football Umpires’ AssociationSurf Lifesaving Association of Australia volunteer for 20 yearsPast President of Rotaract Club of Largs BayChurch involvement – Eucharistic Minister, Reader and Youth LeaderInaugural member of Wimmera Hospice CommitteeG’Day USA leader in 2010, 2013 and 2016Young Citizen of the Year – Kara JohnsonMember of Horsham Volleyball Association for over 10 years where she has held a number of administrative rolesAdvocated for the development of younger female members through the Association Academy ProgramVolunteered her time and undertaken many varied tasks asked of herCaptained the team to achieve a silver medal at the Victorian Country Championships and was a member of the Western Phantoms State League teamWas elected assistant coach of the Victorian Gold TeamHas assisted with the planning of the Horsham Volleyball Association 40 Year celebrationsCommunity Event of the Year – Horsham Arts Council’s 50thAnniversary SpectacularThe Horsham Arts Council encourages and provides the opportunity for people of all ages to follow their passion in the performing arts sectorThe Horsham Arts Council has received nominations and commendations from the Music Theatre Guild of Victoria for its past eight productionsThe Horsham Arts Council has been a significant part of the Wimmera’s cultural community for over 50 years. They have a long history of providing astounding musical performancesThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.